Talking About BPD Aims

 

1. To break down some of the silences, shame and stereotypes around BPD. 

 

2. To share my life so that others going through similar experiences might feel less alone. 

 

3. To highlight that lived experience and peer support are valuable forms of knowledge and support. 

 

4. To campaign for all people with a diagnosis of BPD to be treated with respect and compassion by everyone, including healthcare professionals. 

 

 

How I believe people with a diagnosis of BPD should be treated by healthcare professionals:

 

1. People with a diagnosis of BPD should be treated with respect and compassion by all medical and mental health professionals. 

 

2. People with a diagnosis of BPD should be offered support from mental health teams, rather than being turned away, as is too often the case.

 

3. People should have a right to reject a diagnosis of BPD and/or the BPD label. 

 

4. People with a diagnosis of BPD should be treated fairly. No diagnosis should be seen as more or less worthy of respect and support than another within mental health and medical settings. 

 

5. People with a diagnosis of BPD should have equal access to talking therapies and psychological treatments, regardless of postcode. 

 

6. The life stories, opinions and individuality of people with a diagnosis of BPD should be listened to and respected; many people with this diagnosis have been through (and continue to go through) abuse, neglect, trauma and chronic invalidation. 

 

7. People with a diagnosis of BPD should be free from stereotyping and shaming across mental health and medical settings.

 

8. People with a diagnosis of BPD should be involved at all stages in decisions about their care ('Nothing about us, without us').

 

 

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​© Talking About BPD

Rosie Cappuccino 2019 UK

Please note that this site is not a substitute for professional medical/mental health advice.

Please see a GP or go to A&E if you need urgent help.

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